Kalimaya Dive Resort http://kalimayadiveresort.com Sumbawa Dive Resort Wed, 06 Jun 2018 04:21:57 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.4 http://kalimayadiveresort.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/cropped-Kalimaya_logo_755x755_teal-32x32.jpg Kalimaya Dive Resort http://kalimayadiveresort.com 32 32 Fun Facts about the Fabulous Frogfish http://kalimayadiveresort.com/2017/12/27/fun-facts-about-the-fabulous-frogfish/ Thu, 28 Dec 2017 04:24:38 +0000 http://kalimayadiveresort.com/?p=3097 Frogfish are one of our favorite creatures to find under water, and for many are a bucket-list must find. Although...

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Frogfish are one of our favorite creatures to find under water, and for many are a bucket-list must find. Although not very rare, or geographically limited, these animals have numerous special abilities helping them camouflage and make them hard to find. You may have already swam by one (or twelve), without even knowing!

Fun facts about the frogfish:

  • There are 47+ species of frogfish
  • Many can change colour over time to camouflage within their surroundings. For giant frogfish this has seen to take place over several weeks.
  • Many can also grow hair and become ‘Hairy Frogfish’… it is not a species in itself!
  • Their attack is amongst the fastest in the world, being able to trap prey in 0.006 seconds!

 

A bit more about the frogfish!

These beautifully ugly creatures can be found anywhere in the atlantic and pacific, where the water temperature is often above 20 degrees Celsius… which is not too bad. At Kalimaya our average temperature is roughly 26-27  degrees, but can go as low as 24 or as high as 29. Bring a wetsuit if you want to go searching, as we have had 6 different species spotted on the house reef alone!

As ‘trap hunters’ these angler fish often lie in wait for passing fish to come in close before BAM opening it’s mouth so fast, up to 1/6000 of a second, creating a vacuum of water and sucking the fish in whole. These fish do not have teeth (more like sandpaper jaws) so they suck the fish in whole. Because they rely on camouflage and do not move much, the best place to find them are on coral bommies (rocks covered in coral), on sponges, or in the sand / coral rubble; which are traditional fish nursery areas.

One special adaptation frog fish have is their ‘illicium’ lure projected from their head.  When frogfish are hungry they wave this lure in front of their head (just like how we traditionally fish with line and lures) to attract small fish and shrimp to come closer.  They have also been observed falling for their own trap and eating other frog fish.

 

So, are they male or female? Most often, all the frogfish we see are female! The male frogfish never grow much more than 1cm in length and when it comes time to mate they attach themselves to the female (sometimes hundreds of times the male’s size), and get absorbed into her skin for genetic transference when the female wants. Gross, but kind of cool at the same time!

There is a rumour that these fish cannot swim, which is a lie. While they can often be seen scuttling along the ocean floor when they change location, if need be they can swim several meters off the ocean floor in an awkward flapping motion moving it’s ginormous head and tiny body (it’s like an orange on a toothpick) to a new location.

Happy searching!

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My Brother Is My Mother – and other Seahorse Problems… http://kalimayadiveresort.com/2015/03/18/my-brother-is-my-mother-seahorse-problems/ Wed, 18 Mar 2015 09:43:31 +0000 http://amber.stylemixthemes.com/demo/?p=288 My brother is my mother. Unusual for you humans perhaps, but for a seahorse it's the norm. I'm a female. So while I do play my own part in the reproductive cycle, it's the boys that...

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The Strange Life Cycle of the Seahorse

My brother is my mother. Unusual for you humans perhaps, but for a seahorse it’s the norm. I’m a female. So while I do play my own part in the reproductive cycle, it’s the boys that are responsible for most of the work. I’m a Pygmy Seahorse and I don’t live long. So I figured I’d better tell my story before I become another critter’s meal.

I’m really quite unique. You only recently discovered my kind, and it was quite by accident. Samples of coral had been taken from the reef and placed in a tank for examination. Low and behold, a tiny little me was spotted hanging on by the tail. Only 3/4 inch high, and in perfect camouflage, it’s not really surprising you had never noticed us before.

But now you know we’re here, divers are rushing to to try and catch a glimpse of us. Our lives aren’t all that different from the habits of our other seahorse cousins. So here’s the inside scoop…..

It’s unusual for seahorses to stick together, but we Pygmies will form small cluster colonies. So the chances are fairly good that should an eagle-eyed diver see one of us, more are nearby.

Let’s Dance. The Courtship Ritual and Pregnancy

As with most species, our story starts with a “boy meets girl” scenario. We Pygmies like to take our time to get to know each other. After a few days of flirting from a far, we get close and do our dance. We like to wrap our tails around each other, and change colour. A boy shows he is ready for a girl’s eggs by pushing water through his empty pouch.

That’s my cue. I get in real close and release my eggs, just as he ejaculates. The fertilized eggs then embed themselves in the wall of the male’s pouch. He provides nutrients and oxygen to the embryos as they develop over several weeks. The exact time it takes for our babies to mature depends primarily on the temperature of the water. Warmer water means our babies grow faster.

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The Happy Day Arrives

As any mother knows, contractions are not the most pleasant part of the parenting process. Fortunately for our seahorse men, birth is a relatively fast process. Our “fry” as you call them, are born extraordinarily tiny, but fully functional. Pygmy fry are amongst the smallest living things in the sea.

Ironically, our Pygmy babies often have a higher survival rate when compared to the offspring of larger seahorses. Perhaps because we are able to blend into the background so well. Like adults, our young seek to attach themselves to something as soon as possible, using their tails. Occasionally, newborns will wrap their tails together to avoid being carried off all together.

Eat, Sleep, Die

It’s unusual for seahorses to stick together, but we Pygmies will form small cluster colonies. So the chances are fairly good that should an eagle-eyed diver see one of us, more are nearby. Once we find a Gorgonian Coral, and anchor ourselves to it, we don’t move around much. We are far too small to negotiate currents, and we have evolved our colouring to perfectly mimic that of the coral.

We feed slowly, often consuming baby brine shrimp. As we lack a digestive system, we need to keep eating constantly. When we are not eating, we rest, swaying gently in the pink branches of the coral trees we call home. We may become a meal for reef fish, crabs or rays if we are found. However, humans are by far the biggest threat facing all of us seahorses.

Some of you want us for medicine, some collect our bodies as souvenirs, and a few keep us alive in aquariums. Perhaps our species biggest fear (and that of other reef creatures) is that we will soon have nowhere left to live. The destruction of the world’s coral reefs threatens so many marine species with extinction. And may ultimately end up in your own…

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The Trouble With Turtles http://kalimayadiveresort.com/2015/03/11/sea-turtle-trouble/ Wed, 11 Mar 2015 12:02:46 +0000 http://amber.stylemixthemes.com/demo/?p=200 There are just seven different species of sea turtles swimming the waters today. Sadly, the one thing they all have in common is that their numbers have plummeted over the past century...

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Our Sea Turtles are in Trouble

There are just seven different species of sea turtles swimming the waters today. Sadly, the one thing they all have in common is that their numbers have plummeted over the past century. The situation is so serious that of those seven species, six are listed as endangered.

Only the Loggerhead didn’t make it on that black list. A list that no species wants to find itself on. However the Loggerhead Turtles are not out of the woods (or the waters?) yet. They are still listed as threatened.

The waters around Kalimaya Dive Resort are home to primarily two species of marine turtles. We consider ourselves very lucky to have regular sightings of healthy Green and Hawksbill turtles. Swimming with one of these gentle creatures is something a diver never forgets.

Sea turtles play an important part of the marine ecosystem. They help to keep the coral reefs and sea grass beds healthy. These are home to many other species including those that are of commercial value. Lobster and shrimp are two of the many species that are caught in these areas.

Time is running out for the sea turtles if the situation remains unchanged. But it’s not too late if everyone pitches in to help.

Green-Sea-Turtle

The Graceful Green Giant

Green Turtles are one of the larger species of marine turtle. They can weigh up to 700 pounds, and have a carapace that measures up to five feet. Like other species of sea turtle they cannot pull their heads back under their shells. Unlike other species of turtle, the adults are herbivores, feeding mainly on sea grass and algae.

Interestingly, young Green Turtles will also eat shrimps and small crabs. As they age they lose their appetite for these foods and become exclusively vegetarian. The Green Turtle does not actually have a green shell. Instead, they got their name from the greenish colour of their skin. You can usually tell a male from a female by the size of their tail. Males tails are longer, and they also tend to be larger than their sisters, mothers, and lovers.

Hope for a Glimpse of a Hawksbill

The Hawksbill Turtle is significantly smaller than their green cousins. Rarely weighing in at more than 150 pounds, their shells can reach a length of about 45 inches. Their name comes from the resemblance that their beaks have to that of a hawk. They also have “claws” at the end of their flippers.

Males have longer claws, thicker tails, and brighter colouring than the female Hawksbills. Both are often found around reefs that are rich in sponges. These are the favoured food of Hawksbills, although they will happily chow down on jelly fish, spiny sea urchins, and a variety of crustaceans.

Many Hawksbill Turtles have died eating plastic bags that have been carelessly discarded in the ocean. They mistake them for jellyfish, and the plastic gets caught in their digestive system, leading to a slow and painful death, often from starvation. Like other species of sea turtles, humans are responsible for their endangered status.

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Despite an international ban on collecting eggs and products made from the turtles’ shells, poachers continue to kill these gentle creatures. The turtles also become tangled in fishing lines and nets and drown. Loss of habitat is another serious concern for those who are trying to save the species. Coastal development means there are fewer quiet beaches where the turtles can nest. Coral reefs are shrinking and being negatively impacted by destructive fishing practices, reducing the availability of food for the turtles.

What Can I Do to Help?

You’ve heard it before, but we’ll say it again…”take only pictures (or memories) and leave only footprints (or bubbles!)” Support dive shops that show a respect for the waters where they operate, and the marine life the seas support. Get involved to raise awareness of the plight of sea turtles, and encourage others to spread the word.

Don’t do nothing! Even a small donation to a conservation group, or a few hours of volunteer time can make a difference. Don’t ever, EVER, even think (for a nanosecond) about throwing your garbage (especially plastic) overboard. In fact, make it a habit to pick up trash when you see it on the beach or in the sea.

Time is running out for the sea turtles if the situation remains unchanged. But it’s not too late if everyone pitches in to help.

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The Rolling Hills of Komodo http://kalimayadiveresort.com/2015/03/11/komodo-park-flora-fauna/ Wed, 11 Mar 2015 12:01:04 +0000 http://amber.stylemixthemes.com/demo/?p=197 Guests of Kalimaya have the chance to see the Komodo Dragon, or it's local name 'Ora', in the wild as we do not go to the generic ranger station with hundreds of tourists...

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Enjoy Watching the Rich and Diverse Flora and Fauna of Komodo above the Water

A trip to the Komodo Island will never be complete if you fail to visit the famed World Heritage Site – West Komodo National Park which boasts of being the home to the most diverse flora and fauna of Indonesia. You cannot just miss to spot the indigenous species of the Komodo Island, the Komodo monitor which is better known as the Komodo dragon. Guests of Kalimaya have the chance to see the Komodo Dragon, or it’s local name ‘Ora’, in the wild as we do not go to the generic ranger station with hundreds of tourists.

The rich terrestrial flora and fauna of the Komodo National Park will never fail to give the pleasure of adventure.

Enjoy the serenity of the place

After the thrill of watching the Komodo Monitors in action, you can enjoy a solitary time of watching the valleys covered with indigenous fauna and the large azure bay. The activeness of the fauna and the serenity of the flora will make you wonder that if it is the same place where you had watched the hunter and the hunted and enjoyed bliss viewing the flora of the region. You will be able to watch the macaque monkeys, the wild boars, water buffalos and deer in their natural habitat. The rich and diverse flora and fauna of the island creates a world of its own.

The apt flora to support the fauna in the habitat

The Komodo Island harbors flora of several endemic species. The main marine vegetation you will find in the island is mangroves, reef-building algae and sea grasses. The vegetation f the park is otherwise characterized b savannah vegetation. This vegetation makes the ideal habitat for the Komodo Dragons to unfold their daily activities. This habitat makes it the ideal dwelling place for other species of fauna like the Timor Deer, water buffalo, wild boar, civet and crab-eating macaques. You surely cannot miss spotting the birds and reptiles of Australian origin like the Sulpher Crested Cuckatoo, the Helmeted Friarbird and the Orange-footed Scrubfowl.

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